1972 Frolic Camper Restoration Project

I’ve been tracking down (affordable) paint for the exterior of the Pink Paradise and as soon as she’s painted I’ll be sure to share her new coat with you.  I’m pretty certain that this will be the last post you will see about her interior restoration.  It’s been a long haul; and she took more time, money, and determination than I originally expected to put forth to finish her up, but I’m so happy with the “new” her.

I couldn’t resist sharing a few before and after pictures of her with you before I close out this chapter of the Pink Paradise.

Tell me, from the pictures below do you like her made into a kitchen or a bedroom better?

As I’ve mentioned before, the bathroom was the biggest challenge since it required a complete tear out, new plumbing and electric, and a remodel.

And what do you think of her new bathroom?  The cedar was hubby’s idea and I absolutely love it.  Smells great and looks so cute!  I’m still looking for the perfect mirror to put in the bathroom. Any ideas?

Thanks for all of your interest in the transformation of the Pink Paradise.  She is a celebrity in her own right.

I’m thinking of turning my love for these old campers into a small business.  If you’re in the market for your very own glamper then please contact me and let’s talk!

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The Challenges of Selling on Esty

I’ve tried my hand at selling on Esty before.  Earlier this year I attempted to sell some vintage costume jewelry and a few other vintage items I’ve collected over the years.  Needless to say my efforts didn’t prove very fruitful.  I ended up selling one item.  The sale of that one item paid for my for my listing and selling fees which were very reasonable. I quickly determined that selling on Esty was not a get rich quick endeavor.  Eventually my listings expired and I threw in the towel and carried my treasures back up to the attic.  At that time, I found my biggest problem was driving traffic to my Esty site.

I recently decided to give selling on Esty another try.  You know the old saying “If at first you don’t succeed, try-try again.” This time I decided to mix thing up a bit.  I opted to sell some of my handmade embossed Christmas cards, homemade dog treats, and some vintage buttons.

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Aside from the same old problem of driving traffic to my site, I’ve found that one of the hardest things about selling something homemade or otherwise, is pricing your items fairly.  I always cringe when it comes to this part of the selling process. I think a fair price for a handmade or homemade item should accurately reflect the labor you put into making that item, along with the cost of materials you purchased.  Vintage items are slightly different however, they are often priced according to the current market trends.  Of course you can ask yourself the ultimate question “Would I spend that kind of money on that item?” But that’s not really a perfect way of deciding on your price.  Everyone’s idea of cheap versus pricey varies, and also depends on how capable you are of producing that item yourself, or finding it elsewhere. 

I recently read that a lot of people who sell on Esty are already very crafty themselves – very obvious. It’s quite likely that most Esty users are sellers, not buyers. 

The trick is getting buyers who aren’t Esty sellers to your site is just that – tricky.  That’s hard to believe especially after reading that in February 2011, Esty sold 1.85 million worth of merchandise in just that month alone.  So what is the trick?  I suspect that advertising your shop outside of Esty, using upgraded selling features that are considerably more costly than the typical listing fee, proper tagging, and building your circles of friends through Esty are just a few ways to draw attention to your site.  Many tips on selling can be found in the sellers handbook which offers a wealth of information but it is quite voluminous.

The bottom line, running a business on-line or elsewhere takes time.  You need to be creative, be able to think outside the box, and devote yourself in both times of success and failure.  There are no easy answers, or rarely get rich quick opportunities.  Hard work, persistence and patience are the key.

The question I ask myself?  Do I have the patience it takes to build my small Esty shop?  Time will tell.

Do you sell on Esty?  What’s your opinion?  Please chime in….