Sour Cream Pumpkin Spiced Doughnut Holes

While fall hasn’t officially arrived, that doesn’t stop me from diving into the delicious apple and pumpkin treats that are typically associated with it.   I can’t wait to make  Crockpot Apple Crisp, Country Apple Caramel Sauce, and Homemade Pumpkin Spice Cake.

But it wouldn’t be right to make all those scrumptious desserts without making these small, but mighty, Sour Cream Pumpkin Spiced Doughnut Holes first. 

I am a big fan of baked doughnut holes.  And as I may have mentioned a time or two before, I always use my babycakes maker when I’m making doughnut holes – less fat involved. 

Now, this isn’t the first time I’ve made Pumpkins Spice Doughnut Holes.  But this recipe is slightly different from the first recipe I shared here.  These doughnut holes are made with sour cream, less oil, and less flour.  I also kicked up the vanilla and pumpkin pie spice a wee bit too.  I honestly have to say that I like both versions of the recipe and I don’t think one is better than the other either.  I think the pumpkin flavor is the star of the show and if you pair them with a cold glass of apple cider or a fresh cup of coffee there is no going wrong.

Sour Cream Pumpkin Spiced Doughnut Holes

1 egg, room temperature

2 tbsp. vegetable oil

1/2 c. brown sugar

1/2 c. granulated sugar

3/4 c. canned pumpkin

1/4 c. sour cream

1/2 tsp. salt

2 tsp. baking powder

2 tsp. pumpkin pie spice

2 tsp. vanilla extract

1 c. all-purpose flour

Cinnamon & sugar mixture

In a large bowl, add egg, oil, sugars, sour cream, and pumpkin; mix thoroughly.  Mix in pumpkin salt, baking powder, pumpkin pie spice, and vanilla.  Add flour; mix until all ingredients are completely blended.

Bake according to babycakes maker.  Cool slightly before coating with cinnamon & sugar mixture.  * I put the mixture in a plastic bag, drop a few doughnut holes in at a time, and shake until the holes are completely coated.

Store in a paper bag.

So, have you had or made a fall treat yet?  If so, what was it? 

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Soft Glazed Pumpkin Sugar Cookies

How many times do you pin a recipe in hopes that some day you will get around to making it?  Yes, yes, I do it all the time too.  But this time, I decided to pick a recipe that I pinned and actually make it.  I also decided to follow the recipe to the letter.  Well, almost to the letter.  But I’ll get to that in a minute. 

This recipe came from the blog Lauren’s Latest.   I’m going to send you directly to her blog to pick up her recipe because I know you are going want it.  I do have to agree with Lauren, these cookies really need the icing on top to WOW you.  Alone they are just kind of ho hum, but with it they are amazing. 

Okay, now back to the minor recipe changes. When I made these cookies I added 2 teaspoons of apple cider to the batter and I eliminated the 1/2 c. of confectioners sugar.  If you compare Lauren’s photo’s to mine you will notice a slight difference in the texture but I’d say they are moist and delicious either way you make them.

What is your favorite recipe that calls for pumpkin?

Homemade Sweet Rolls with a Secret Ingredient (Pumpkin)

One of my most favorite baked treats is the one I tend to make least often.   That might be a good thing for my waistline, but I’ve decided that is just plain unacceptable.

Now, many of you probably call these cinnamon rolls, but from the time I was a little girl I’ve known them as sweet rolls.   Making homemade sweet rolls can take a little time out of your already busy schedules but there isn’t nothing like um…

These rolls have a soft and chewy texture, and their yellow color is a result of using my secret ingredient – pumpkin.   And while I’m talking about the color yellow, some of you have noticed that many of my baked goods tend to be more yellow than other similar recipes.  That’s because I use our very own farm fresh eggs that our busy little chickens lay for us each day.  The yolks in fresh eggs are so much darker and richer than the eggs you purchase in a grocery store.  And why?  I’m not certain, but I did read somewhere that grocery store eggs are at least 45 days old before they are available for purchase.   I suppose that might have something to do with it.

Homemade Sweet Rolls

Makes about 1 1/2 dozen rolls.

Dough

1/4 c. margarine

1/2 c. granulated sugar

1/2 c. milk

1 1/4 tsp. salt

1 egg, beaten

1 tbsp., plus 1 tsp. of yeast

1 c. hot water

1/2 c. canned pumpkin

5 c. all-purpose flour, plus 1 1/4 c. for kneading

Filling

1 c. brown sugar, packed

1 tbsp. cinnamon

1/4 c. margarine, softened (for spreading on the dough)

Icing

1 1/4 c. powdered sugar

1/2 tsp. vanilla

1 – 2 tbs. milk

Put margarine, sugar, milk and salt into a saucepan; heat until margarine melts.  In large bowl, add yeast, 2 cups of flour, egg, pumpkin, and hot water; mix completely.  Add remaining flour and mix thoroughly.  *Note – the dough will be sticky but you want it that way.  On a floured surface, using some of the flour you’ve set aside for kneading, knead the dough until it is no soft, tender, and just slightly sticky.  Form into a ball and place in a greased bowl.  Cover with greased plastic wrap and let rise until double.

Grease a 9”x13” pan.  Line the bottom of the pan with a piece of parchment paper and lightly grease the top of the paper.

Once dough has doubled, punch down and cut in half.  With a rolling pin, roll each half in equal sized rectangular shapes (about 1/2“ thick). Spread softened margarine on top of the dough, and sprinkle prepared brown sugar filling equally on each piece.  Starting with the longest side of the rectangle, roll each piece into a log.  With a sharp knife, cut the dough into (about 1 1/2”) slices and place into prepared pan – just so they aren’t touching.  Cover with greased plastic wrap and let rise until doubled.

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Bake in 350 degree oven for about 20 minutes, or until rolls sound hollow when tapped.  Let cool, and prepare icing.

In a bowl, thoroughly mix sugar, vanilla and milk.  Drizzle over top of warm sweet rolls.

One thing that’s worth mentioning – when I make sweet rolls I usually cut the very ends off of the logs so that each piece will be equal in size.  Most of the time I will fit the odd pieces into the pan between the perfectly shaped rolls.  If you are serving the pan of rolls to company and you want them to look perfect then toss the ends out.  I just hate to waste deliciousness!

I divided this pan of rolls up and put most of them in the freezer. When I need them (yes, need) I’ll thaw a package and breakfast is served.

Do you freeze baked goods for a rainy day? Or, are you saying what rainy day?

The Two Ingredient Mini Cupcake

Okay, for those of you who have heard of this recipe, why the heck didn’t you tell me about it?  You’ll never guess who did end up telling me about it – a doctor.

This recipe only requires two things to make these delicious, moist, and chocolaty mini’s.

1.) Your favorite brand and flavor of cake mix. 

2.)  One 15 ounce can of pure pumpkin.

That’s right, no eggs and no oil.  The elimination of those two items makes this recipe much lower in calories, and much healthier.  

Want to be creative? Try adding dark chocolate chips to these, or make them with a carrot, spice, or vanilla cake mix. 

I did a little research on these mini’s after the doctor told me about them.  I found the directions for making them, along with the nutritional information, at the Hungry Girl

I made a couple minor adjustments.  I added about 2 tablespoons of water to the bottom of  the pumpkin can to rinse it out.  I then added that water right into the batter.  I also baked my mini’s at 325 degrees for about 14-15 minutes.  Check with a toothpick to make sure it comes out clean before removing them from the oven.

I am currently looking for healthier recipes to share here at The Joy of Caking.  If you’ve got a healthier tried and true recipe that you’d love to share, or would like to guest post with me – PLEASE email me!

 

Baked Pumpkin Spice Doughnut Holes

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Every time that I looked in my cupboard this week I’d see a can of pumpkin staring me down.  I’d set it aside, and somehow it would make it’s way front and center again. 

I took this as a sign.  It wasn’t that I didn’t want to use the pumpkin.  I just couldn’t decide what to make with it.  Pumpkin bars, cake, cookies, cheesecake, pie; they all seemed like good choices to me. 

And then it hit me.  Doughnut holes – baked, not fried!  I  found a great recipe at two peas & their pod.  And best of all, their pictures convinced me that these were the doughnut holes I’ve been waiting for all my life.  Ah… Inspiration!

Have you ever had a treat that was just to tempting to keep sitting around?  Well, I’ve lost count on how many of these I’ve eaten since I made them, and they definitely  fall into that “just too tempting” category.  I think once you try these you will agree that there  isn’t any reason to ever fry a doughnut again.  

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I tweaked two peas recipe just a little and here is my adapted version.

Baked Pumpkin Spice Doughnut Holes

1 large egg

1/3 c. olive oil

1/2 c. light brown sugar

1/2 c. granulated sugar

3/4 c. canned pumpkin

1 1/2 tsp. pumpkin pie spice

1/2 tsp. salt

2 tsp. baking powder

1 tsp. vanilla extract

1/2 c. milk

1 1/2 c. all-purpose flour

Cinnamon & sugar mixture

In large bowl, add egg, oil, sugars, and pumpkin; mix thoroughly.  Mix in pumpkin pie spice, salt, baking powder, and vanilla.  Add flour and milk; mix until all ingredients are completely blended.

I used my babycakes maker to make my doughnuts.  If you don’t have a babycakes maker then check out two peas and their pod for an alternate way of baking them.

When the doughnut holes are still hot, roll them in the prepared cinnamon & sugar mixture and let them cool before devouring…

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These might be best stored in a brown paper bag so the cinnamon and sugar-coating doesn’t disappear.  I put mine in an airtight container overnight which made them super moist, but they had to be re-coated in the morning.

I’m so glad it’s pumpkin season!  How about you?

What is your favorite doughnut hole flavor?  Looking for another great baked doughnut hole recipe?  Click here!

Trick or Treat…

Wishing everyone a Happy Halloween with Pumpkin Spice Oatmeal Cookies!

1 c. pumpkin

1/2 c. margarine, softened

 1 c. brown sugar

 3/4 c. sugar

1 egg

 1/2 tsp. cinnamon

 1/4 tsp. nutmeg

 1 1/2 tsp. pumpkin pie spice

 1 1/2 tsp. salt

 tsp. vanilla

1 tsp. baking powder

 1/4 tsp. baking soda

 1 1/4 c. flour

3/4 c. quick-cook oatmeal

1/4 c. semi-sweet chocolate chips for melting

In a large bowl combine pumpkin, margarine, sugar, egg, spices and vanilla.  With electric mixer beat until mixed well.  Add flour, oats, baking powder, and soda.  Mix until all ingredients are combined.

Drop onto  lightly greased cookie sheets.  Bake for about 12-15 minutes.  Cool slightly on cookie sheet before removing.  Transfer to cooling rack.  Melt chocolate for 1 minute, or longer if necessary, in microwave.  Drizzle on top of each cookie.

Recipe adapted from Southern Living 1979 Annual Recipes.  I omitted nuts, chocolate chips, and raisins, and added a tsp. of vanilla.  *** Note – after the cookies sat overnight in an airtight container they got extremely moist, so moist they are hard to handle.  I think  I’ll  increase the flour a bit  when  I make them again.  They are very flavorful – a nice spicy cookie.

Giant What?

Pumpkins….. My latest endeavor came on a whim. To grow one of New York State’s largest pumpkins. Although I’m not really out to set any world records, the idea of growing a 500 pound pumpkin in our back yard motivates me – just a little.

I found this packet of seeds for growing giant 400-500 lb pumpkins as we were strolling through the garden center at Lowes the other day. I figured it would be a couple bucks well spent just to see how easy, or not, it is to grow a giant pumpkin.

The package contained six seeds (was supposed to have seven). Last night I planted three seeds each, in used yogurt cups (with holes in the bottom for drainage) and I used dirt from our garden (nothing fancy about our garden dirt). The pack say’s it should take around 7 days to germinate so I’m watching for the first sign of life. The pumpkins will need 120 days to mature so I figure we will need a big set of scales handy sometime in September.